As supporters of quality public schools, we strongly urge Mayor Bowser to release vacant and under-utilized school buildings to high-performing charter schools, as required by law. This transformative process would close the achievement gap and make DC a model of cross-sector collaboration.

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Call on Mayor Bowser to release vacant schools

We’re calling for solutions that allow:

· DC families to get off charter school waiting lists;

· Renovation of abandoned buildings to become community assets;

· Charter facilities funds to go to city-owned properties;

· DCPS schools to earn revenue for programs in under-utilized buildings;

· A win-win-win for families, both school sectors, and DC communities.

Today, the waitlist for D.C.'s high-performing public charter schools includes the names of more than 12,000 students. Sign the petition to ask Mayor Bowser to release 1 million square feet of abandoned school buildings, helping charter schools end the list.

Watch the WUSA9 Segment on Waiting Lists

  • The record of DC charters in improving student performance is at an all-time high. The share of charter students meeting state college- and career-readiness benchmarks (PARCC) has increased every year!
  • Charter schools have higher proficiency rates on the state tests than open enrollment DC public schools do among African American students and among those who are considered at-risk — homeless, in foster care, eligible for food stamps or welfare, or overaged and undercredited. 
  • Charter schools have boosted high school graduation rates, which are higher in charters than the city average — both for students as a whole and, significantly, for economically disadvantaged students.

Public Charter School Student Success!

  • Compared to district school peers, urban charter school students received approximately 40 additional days of learning in math and 28 additional days of learning in reading
  • Gains more pronounced for minority students from low income backgrounds
  • Black students living in poverty gained 59 additional days in math, and 44 days in reading

A definitive national study has found that:


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